BobFest Information Links

WISCONSIN GRASSROOTS NETWORK MINING INFORMATION

In our metallic and sand mining blogs, we try to keep up with both metallic mining issues in the Penokee Hills (northern Wisconsin) and frac sand mining (also known as industrial sand mining or hydraulic frac sand mining) in the Driftless Area of western and west central Wisconsin. 

We also suggest: http://savethewatersedge.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/MAMAmadison for specific items of interest on the Penokees and http://www.facebook.com/preservetrempealeaucounty, https://www.facebook.com/PreserveWaupacaCounty and http://crawfordstewardshipproject.org/ as representative sites worth visiting for sand mining updates.  

Nonmetallic mining overview - Wisconsin DNR and Metallic mining overview - Wisconsin DNR are state government websites offering overviews of state regulation of these natural resource areas. National regulatory organizations include the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (http://www.usace.army.mil/), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (osha.gov) and the Environmental Protection Agency (epa.gov). Other agencies with potential regulatory interests include the Great Lakes Compact (glc.org - a multi-state and multi-national organization with interest in the water quality and quantity of water in the Great Lakes) and the U.S. Coast Guard (http://www.uscg.mil/), which regulates all navigable waters of the U.S.

Also pertinent are the following national environmental organizations with interests in Wisconsin mining: the Sierra Club (http://wisconsin.sierraclub.org/Mining.asp) and the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters (http://conservationvoters.org/).

Native American interests in various mining projects are covered in many of the above sites as well as in the sites of the impacted nations and tribes: the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe (http://www.badriver-nsn.gov/) and the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Ojibwe (http://www.lco-nsn.gov/). Please note that the bands refer to themselves by "Chippewa" and "Ojibwe". To most Anglo ears, the words are pronounced interchangeably.